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Best Methods to Store Strawberries

Best Methods to Store Strawberries

Best Methods to Store Strawberries

How we tested these methods?

The strawberries were kept in the refrigerator for seven days to test all of the techniques listed (except for the freezer method). Strawberries and other fresh berries deteriorate faster when left out at room temperature due to mold spores on their surfaces. Refrigerating them slows down this process, giving you additional time to use them. When you need to preserve strawberries for more than a day or two, this is the best solution.

1st Method to store strawberries: Original Container

About This Method:

Strawberries are commonly sold in plastic clamshell boxes or wooden or cardboard berry baskets. They have holes on the sides and a lid to allow air to circulate around the berries.

How to Do It:

The simplest approach to attempt is this. Simply place the container in the refrigerator. (However, if you notice rotten or mushy berries, discard them first.)

Is It Effective?

This approach worked great for storing fresh strawberries in the fridge for a few days, but after seven days, they had developed some mushy patches and a few, small mold particles. The leaves appeared to be wilted as well. The strawberries were somewhat edible, and it would be better to chop them up for a dish so that the nasty areas could be removed.

The Final Word: Not bad.

If you’re in a hurry, this is a good storage option as long as you expect to eat the berries within 3-5 days. If you leave them out for too long, they can spoil and become unappealing.

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2nd Method to store strawberries: Vinegar Bath

Best Methods to Store Strawberries

About This Method: Vinegar bath is a good method to store strawberries. Freshly harvested berries contain naturally occurring mold spores, which cause them to deteriorate over time. Strawberry spores are killed by rinsing them with vinegar, so they can’t harm the fruit.

How to Do It:

Mix one cup of white vinegar with two cups of water for this approach. Swish the entire strawberries around in the mixture for approximately a minute. The berries should then be rinsed with clean water (this mini colander is perfect for washing berries). Place the strawberries on a tray lined with a dish towel to dry. Place them back in the original container and keep them in the fridge after they’re totally dry.

Is It Effective?

We were surprised by the results, as other sources extol the virtues of this storage method. To be sure, we tested the method twice. The strawberries were withered and black, with mushy patches and wilted leaves. The berries didn’t seem inviting at all, even though there were no symptoms of mildew. When strawberries are washed, they absorb water, hastening their decomposition. Even after being spread out to dry, the strawberries retained the moisture they had absorbed, which harmed their freshness. It’s better to wait until the last minute to wash strawberries before using them in a dish.

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3rd Method to store strawberries : The Crisper

Best Methods to Store Strawberries

This Method’s Details:

Fruit and vegetable crisper drawers in refrigerators are intended to store them. The drawers contain vents to assist product survive as long as possible by creating high or low humidity conditions.

How to do it:

Place entire strawberries on a tray coated with clean paper towels or reusable refrigerator liners, and set aside. The paper towels will aid by collecting moisture on the strawberry surfaces or leaking juices, as moisture speeds up the deterioration of strawberries. Open the vents after your tray of berries is in the drawer to allow moisture to escape and keep humidity low.

Is It Effective?

The strawberries, for the most part, looked excellent after seven days. The bulk of the strawberries were still solid and ready to eat, despite the limp leaves and one fruit that was beginning to sprout mildew.

 

 

 

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